Our team in Belgrade has taken over full ownership of our existing core system and works closely with our in-house engineers on delivering new features.

Andreas Emlinger CEO, Global Pension AG

Blog

Working Remotely. Same Standards, Better Conditions.

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 8, 2016
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Outsourcing is becoming an increasingly popular business venture. The individual or team contracted can either work in close proximity to the business head office (nearshoring) or in a distant location (farshoring). The concept of working remotely is frequently misperceived as an ineffective, however, statistics show that outsourcing (nearshoring in particular) reduces business costs by around 50% when compared to insourcing. Saving costs is only the tip of the iceberg.

This feisty article continues to discuss some of the most used and abused excuses against remote working and fights back with some serious myth-busting moves.

Reshoring: when outsourcing fails

Posted by Marko Djuric on November 16, 2016
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scheitern (1)

Reshoring, a practice that originated in the United States, involves the return of the business and its production processes back into their own country or surrounding countries with a common border, which were initially outsourced abroad (Offshoring).

Digitale Transformation in Europa: IT-Outsourcing auf dem Vormarsch

Posted by Marko Djuric on October 31, 2016
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Nearshoring - Digitale Transformation Europa

Outsourcing wird längst nicht mehr nur zur Reduktion klassischer Produktionskosten betrieben. Auch die Verlagerung von Dienstleistungen ins Ausland erfreut sich wachsender Beliebtheit, wofür neben den Kostenvorteilen auch der Mangel an Fachkräften in Deutschland verantwortlich ist.

Offshoring, Nearshoring, Onshoring & Outsourcing

Posted by Marko Djuric on October 20, 2016
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Characteristics and Differences

Teamwork

Near – Off – Out – On, first of all we need to keep track. Four terms whose meanings are similar, but explain different situations. Offshoring, Nearshoring, Onshoring and Outsourcing all point to the internal activities of a company and whether or not they will be performed internally, externally or both.

Nearshoring and dedicated software development team in Serbia

Posted by on October 13, 2016
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d1882db3343358c81407eb145feb52c8

On the initiative of the Swiss Embassy, Ms. Katalin Dreher, Senior Expert for SEE, with the Switzerland-Global Enterprise (S-GE) visited the complex of STP Belgrade andInterVenture

S-GE has been commissioned by the Swiss government to inform, advise and guide SMEs from Switzerland and Liechtenstein in their international business ventures, thus facilitating efficient location and foreign trade promotion. It links companies with experts and organizations around the world.

Marko Djuric, Manager Partner at InterVenture and Ms. Katalin Dreher shared about Nearshoring and dedicated software development team in Serbia.

 

Robert Boxall and Alex King from Gogo, our client, speakers at VOXXED DAYS Belgrade

Posted by on October 11, 2016
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We were really proud to have Robert and Alex on stage sharing  their experience on Microservices and Devops.

You can watch the replay on youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LU9MvN7db6E the speech from Robert starts at 2:48

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KQR3_Ol697I the speech from Alex starts at 8:00

befunky-collage11-10

IT Outsourcing in the UK 2016

Posted by Marko Djuric on October 3, 2016
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London Business2

Outsourcing, which means the contracting out of a business process, has proved to be popular with UK companies, and it is very useful when it comes to forming and maintaining an IT workforce. An example of outsourcing would be when a telecommunications firm outsources to a website development agency. That agency, of course, does not have to be in the same country, and this is where nearshoring comes in very handy.

10 key factors for successful Nearshoring [Infographic]

Posted by Marko Djuric on September 28, 2016
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Nearshoring enables the recruitment of qualified personnel in nearby countries, who become a fully integrated part of the company as remote teams. Especially in the IT sector, this kind of company organization is very common. Communication between remote teams and the company must be clear. Leadership, coordinated communication channels, and the right tools are the most important requirements.

Welcome TAMEDIA

Posted by on September 23, 2016
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That the way we celebrate our new partnerships at InterVenture! Welcome TAMEDIA http://www.tamedia.ch/en/

befunky-collage23-09

Reshoring: Gescheitert beim Outsourcing

Posted by Marko Djuric on September 13, 2016
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Scheitern beim Outsourcing

Als Reshoring, ursprünglich von den Vereinigten Staaten ausgehend, bezeichnet man die Praxis der Rückführung jener Unternehmens- oder Herstellungsprozesse ins Inland oder in benachbarte Länder, die im Rahmen des Outsourcings ins Ausland verlagert wurden (Offshoring).

Virtual teams: A cost effective way to build a professional IT department

Posted by Marko Djuric on August 30, 2016
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Laptop Desk

Growing medium-sized companies are often faced with a difficult decision in terms of the IT department. They either rely on the IT department internally (in-house) or they opt for outsourcing. This important decision should be well covered however because both solutions have advantages and disadvantages.

Nearshoring 2.0 – Virtuelle Teams für mehr Effizienz beim Outsourcing

Posted by Marko Djuric on August 9, 2016
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Nearshoring bietet Unternehmen die Möglichkeit, einzelne Arbeitsprozesse in das nahe gelegene Ausland auszulagern. In Form individuell zusammengestellter Teams lassen sich dabei die bestmöglichen Ergebnisse erreichen. Am Fallbeispiel des Unternehmens Mediatech Solutions wird deutlich, warum diese spezielle Form des Outsourcings als zielführende Weiterentwicklung zu verstehen ist.

Under pressure!!!!!

Posted by Laetitia Jovanovic on August 3, 2016
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Take calm: Engineers under pressure…

BeFunky Collage3

Nearshoring Advantages – The Future of Outsourcing

Posted by Marko Djuric on July 22, 2016
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Advantages and New Challenges of Nearshoring

Outsourcing is a common practice for many European companies. However, different factors must be taken into consideration. Based on specific needs, companies decide whether to outsource to very far away regions, usually Asian countries (Offshoring), or back to immediate surroundings (Onshoring). A compromise between on- and off-shoring is Nearshoring.

10 Tipps für erfolgreiches Nearshoring [Infografik]

Posted by Marko Djuric on July 5, 2016
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Nearshoring ermöglicht es Fachpersonal in nahegelegenen Ländern zu rekrutieren, die als Remote Teams ein vollständiger Teil eines Unternehmens werden. Vor allem in der IT-Branche ist diese Art von Unternehmensorganisation sehr verbreitet. Es gilt zu beachten, dass die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Remote Teams und Unternehmen einwandfreie Kommunikation voraussetzt. Mitarbeiterführung, abgestimmte Kommunikationswege und die richtigen Tools sind die wichtigsten Voraussetzungen.

Reasons for Nearshoring to Eastern Europe

Posted by Marko Djuric on July 5, 2016
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Nearshoring in Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe has become much more important in outsourcing tasks for companies located in the rest of Europe, whether the country being Serbia, Poland, Czech Republic, Ukraine, Bulgaria or Romania.Various studies show that, for example, German employers increasingly decide for Nearshoring in Eastern Europe countries. This is not really surprising, particularly because there are many good reasons for outsourcing business activities in these countries.

ICT Standort Serbien I – Voraussetzungen

Posted by Marko Djuric on June 1, 2016
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Immer noch stößt der Gedanke an die Auslagerung betrieblicher Tätigkeiten ins nahe Ausland bei vielen Mitgliedern des Managements auf Widerstand. Doch gut strukturiert und mit ausreichend finanziellen Ressourcen versehen kann dieses Unterfangen eine Chance und ein Gewinn für jedes Unternehmen werden.

ICT Standort Serbien II – Erfolgsgeschichten

Posted by Marko Djuric on June 1, 2016
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Erfolgsgeschichte I – das Microsoft Entwicklungs-Center in Serbien

IT Success Stories

Im Jahr 2005 gründete Microsoft das serbische Entwicklungs-Center. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war es das fünfte Entwicklungs-Center außerhalb der Vereinigten Staaten.

IT Headhunting

Posted by on April 27, 2016
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Der hierzulande grassierende Fachkräftemangel macht auch vor der IT-Branche nicht halt, Headhunter verzeichnen auf der Suche nach IT-Spezialisten eine gute Auftragslage. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Überblick über die aktuelle Situation der IT Headhunter in Deutschland und geht der Frage nach Alternativen auf den Grund.

ICT Sektor Serbien

Posted by on March 31, 2016
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novi-sad-serbia

Ist Nearshoring in Serbien eine probate Antwort auf den IT-Fachkräftemangel Deutschlands?

Deutschland sucht verzweifelt nach Personal und das nicht seit “gestern” (oder) “heute”. Die durchgeführten Studien sagen deutlich aus, dass der Bedarf an Fachkräften im IT Bereich ständig zunehmen wird und sich die Decke an qualifiziertem Personal massiv ausdünnt. Rund 40 Prozent aller Unternehmen in Deutschland sehen die Suche nach geeignetem IT-Fachpersonal als besondere Herausforderung an.

Virtuelle Teams als Möglichkeit einer professionellen IT-Abteilung

Posted by Marko Djuric on January 28, 2016
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Laptop Desk

Wachsende mittelständische Unternehmen stehen oftmals vor einer schwierigen Entscheidung im Hinblick auf die IT-Abteilung. Entweder bauen sie den IT-Bereich intern (Inhouse) auf oder sie entscheiden sich für das Outsourcing. Diese wichtige Entscheidung sollte gut überdacht werden, denn beide Lösungen haben Vor- und Nachteile.

Die IT-Welt – Arbeitsformen in der IT-Branche

Posted by Marko Djuric on January 28, 2016
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Numbers

Die IT-Aufgaben in einem Unternehmen müssen professionell und zeitnah von einem Fachmann gelöst werden. Unternehmen haben in der heutigen Zeit wesentlich mehr Möglichkeiten im Hinblick auf die Betreuung der ihrer IT-Infrastruktur als früher. Neben einer internen IT-Abteilung und dem bekannten Outsourcing können Unternehmen auch auf moderne Lösungen zurückgreifen. Als Alternative zu den beliebten Far- und Offshoring-Methoden bietet sich auch das vorteilhafte Nearshoring an.

Die wichtigsten Gründe für Nearshoring im Überblick [Infografik]

Posted by Marko Djuric on January 19, 2016
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Das sogenannte Nearshoring ist als eine Art Sonderform des klassischen Offshorings zu verstehen. So handelt es sich dabei um die Verlagerung betrieblicher Aktivitäten in nahe gelegene Regionen. Um diesen Trend nachzuvollziehen und für das eigene Unternehmen zu nutzen, müssen die speziellen Gründe für Nearshoring analysiert werden.

Vorteile und Herausforderungen des Nearshoring

Posted by Marko Djuric on January 11, 2016
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Outsourcing Vorteil Nearshoring SF

Outsourcing von Betriebsabläufen ist eine Option, die viele Unternehmen auch in Europa gezogen haben. Verschiedene Erwägungen spielen dabei eine Rolle. Diese entscheiden dann darüber, ob Outsourcing in die unmittelbare Umgebung erfolgt (Onshoring) oder in sehr weit entfernte, meist sogenannte Billiglohnländer (Offshoring). Als Kompromiss gibt es immer häufiger das sogenannte Nearshoring. Die Motive hierfür und resultierenden Herausforderungen werden im Folgenden abgewogen.

InterVenture new Offices

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 23, 2015
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We are very excited to announce our move into the Belgrade Technology Park at the beginning of next year.

Offshoring, Nearshoring, Onshoring und Outsourcing – Merkmale und Unterschiede

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 22, 2015
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Teamarbeit

Near – Off – Out – On, hier gilt es zunächst einmal, den Überblick zu behalten. Vier Begriffe, deren Bedeutungen ähnlich sind, die aber verschiedene Sachverhalte erklären. Offshoring, Nearshoring, Onshoring und Outsourcing weisen darauf hin, wo Teile der betrieblichen Aktivitäten eines Unternehmens durchgeführt und ob sie dabei vom Unternehmen selbst übernommen werden.

Gründe für ein Nearshoring in Osteuropa

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 11, 2015
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Platz der Republik in Belgrad

Ob Serbien, Polen, Tschechien, Ukraine, Bulgarien oder Rumänien – Osteuropa gewinnt für hiesige Unternehmen immer mehr an Bedeutung. Diverse Untersuchungen zeigen, dass sich deutsche Arbeitgeber beim Nearshoring zunehmend für die Länder Osteuropas entscheiden. Dies ist jedoch nicht weiter verwunderlich, zumal viele gute Gründe für eine Auslagerung von Geschäftsaktivitäten in diese Länder sprechen.

Auslagerung von Unternehmensteilen mangels Fachkräften erforderlich

Sprich mit den Experten

Laut dem Bundesverband Informationswirtschaft, Telekommunikation und neue Medien e.V. (BITKOM) stieg in Deutschland die Zahl unbesetzter Stellen für IT-Experten im in der Vergangenheit um 13 Prozent. Insbesondere dieser Fachkräftemangel zwingt immer mehr deutsche Unternehmen, die eigenen Entwicklungstätigkeiten auszulagern. In diesem Zusammenhang stellt sich im nächsten Schritt die Frage nach dem geeigneten Land. Stark auf dem Vormarsch ist hierbei das Nearshoring nach Osteuropa, da diese Regionen im Vergleich zu Entwicklungsländern wie Indien zahlreiche Vorteile bieten.

Hierzu gehören:

1. Niedrige Arbeitskosten

Zu den Hauptgründen, die deutsche Unternehmen für eine Auslagerung in den Osten Europas veranlassen, gehören selbstverständlich die vergleichsweise niedrigen Arbeitskosten. Durch die Vergabe von Arbeiten in diese Nearshore-Regionen werden teilweise Kosteneinsparungen von 30 bis 50 Prozent in Aussicht gestellt. Die Ansicht mancher Personalleiter, dass es den Menschen in diesen Ländern an der notwendigen Ausbildung und den Skills fehle, wird zusehends widerlegt. Inzwischen konnten sich schon mehrere Osteuropäische Länder als herausragender IT-Standort etablieren.

2. Keine großen kulturellen Hürden

Seit der politischen Wende im Jahr 1989 haben sich Kulturen in Europa zusehends angenähert. Wert-Anschauungen, das Verhältnis zu Hierarchien, Verlässlichkeit und Umgangsformen unterscheiden sich heute nur sehr gering. Dies ist ein großer Vorteil gegenüber einer Softwareentwicklung in Asien, wo die kulturellen Unterschiede zu komplikationen und höheren Projektkosten führen können.

3. Gute sprachliche Kompetenzen

Sprachliche Schwierigkeiten können eine Geschäftsbeziehung belasten und mit teuren Missverständnissen sowie längeren Projektlaufzeiten einhergehen. Unter diesem Gesichtspunkt kann Osteuropa weitere Vorteile ausspielen, zumal nachweislich knapp 40 Prozent aller Schüler in den neuen EU-Mitgliedsstaaten die deutsche Sprache lernen. Mehr als 70 Prozent lernen ferner Englisch auf international wettbewerbsfähigem Niveau. Gerade die Sprache der Mitarbeiter ist eine wichtige Grundlage für eine effiziente Kommunikation.

Tastatur Mac Book

4. Verfügbarkeit und Qualifikation von Personal

Jedes Jahr graduieren in Osteuropa eine große Anzahl an IT-Studenten. Demzufolge ist das Angebot an qualifizierten Fachkräften sehr groß. Weil das Anforderungsprofil in Bezug auf die Qualität der Ausbildung merklich gestiegen ist, verfügen die Hochschulabsolventen und Berufseinsteiger über ein fundiertes Knowhow. Als Folge hieraus investieren immer mehr internationale Unternehmen hier in Zentren für Forschung und Entwicklung wie auch in den Bau von Wissenschafts- und Kommunikationstechnologien.

5. Reisen und Zeitzone

Ein positiver Aspekt des Nearshoring sind zudem die geringen bis leichten Visa- und Einreisebestimmungen für Bürger osteuropäischer Staaten. Hinzu kommt die leichtere Vermeidung von Risiken in Bezug auf die Datenschutzrichtlinien. Wer nämlich personenbezogene Daten außerhalb Europas verarbeiten lässt, geht das Risiko ein, dass der Dienstleister trotz Zertifizierung nicht die Vorgaben des Bundesdatenschutzgesetzes (BDSG) erfüllt. Für Verstöße haftet dann der Auftraggeber, nicht der Nearshore-Partner. Nicht zuletzt sind etwa Ingenieure aus Osteuropa besser mit EU-Gesetzen (z.B. hinsichtlich des geistigen Eigentums) vertraut, als eine Fachkraft aus Asien. Für Osteuropa sprechen aber auch der kurze Anfahrtsweg und die geringen bis nicht vorhandenen Zeitunterschiede. Zwischen Deutschland und Indien beträgt der Zeitunterschied hingegen je nach Sommer- oder Winterzeit 3 ½ bis 4 ½ Stunden. Geographische Nähe ist somit ein entscheidender Wettbewerbsvorteil. Viele Probleme lassen sich zudem nur von Angesicht zu Angesicht im persönlichen Kontakt lösen.

Fazit

Berechnungen über den Anteil Osteuropas am weltweiten Outsourcing-Markt gehen von 43 Prozent aus, somit Rang zwei unmittelbar hinter Indien. Experten gehen davon aus, dass sich dieser Anteil angesichts oben genannter Argumentation in den kommenden Jahren vergrößern wird. Bereits die Kostenvorteile, die geographische Nähe, das steigende Bildungsniveau sowie die vergleichsweise geringen kulturellen Unterschiede, sprechen für ein zunehmendes Interesse deutscher Unternehmen an ein Offshoring zu Gunsten osteuropäischer Staaten.

Bilder (CC BY 2.0): Jorge Láscar, Mai Le, Nana B Agyei

Arbeitsmarkt und Nearshoring – Fachkräftemangel

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 1, 2015
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Viele Unternehmen haben Schwierigkeiten, offene Positionen im IT-Bereich zu besetzen. Der vielfach beklagte Fachkräftemangel macht sich hier nachhaltig bemerkbar. Alleine in der Schweiz fehlen einer Studie zufolge in den nächsten Jahren bis zu 30.000 Informatiker. Nicht minder problematisch sieht es im benachbarten Deutschland aus. In einer Umfrage einer der größten deutschen Online-Jobbörsen stehen IT-Berufe noch vor Ingenieuren und technischen Berufen an erster Stelle, wenn es um besondere Herausforderungen bei der Fachkräftesuche geht.

Nachfrage steigt schneller als das Angebot

nearshoring

Das Grundproblem im IT-Bereich in beiden Ländern ist, dass der Bedarf an qualifizierten Kräften schneller wächst als das Angebot. Alleine in der Schweiz ist die Anzahl der Beschäftigten im Bereich IT und Kommunikation seit der Jahrtausendwende um über 40 Prozent gestiegen. Die Entwicklung in Deutschland ist ähnlich verlaufen. So schnell kommen Universitäten und Hochschulen trotz Anstrengungen mit der Ausbildung nicht nach, zumal das Interesse an IT-Berufen nicht in gleichem Maße wächst. Auch die verstärkte Anwerbung ausländischer IT-Fachkräfte konnte die Lücken nicht schließen. Angesichts dieser Situation werden alternative Lösungen dringend gesucht.

„Was bedeutet Offshoring und Nearshoring?”

Oft wird dafür Offshoring gewählt. Darunter wird generell die Auslagerung unternehmerischer Funktionen ins Ausland verstanden. Offshoring ist nicht mit Outsourcing gleichzusetzen, obwohl viele Offshoring-Lösungen als Outsourcing verwirklicht werden. Beim Outsourcing findet üblicherweise eine rechtlich-organisatorische Auslagerung statt, Offshoring setzt das nicht zwingend voraus. Es gibt eine Vielzahl an Umsetzungsmöglichkeiten.

welt1

Nearshoring - auf Deutsch auch Nahverlagerung – kann in diesem Zusammenhang als Pendant des Offshoring gesehen werden, nämlich die Auslagerung unternehmerischer Funktionen speziell ins nahe Ausland. Die geografische Nähe bildet dabei das maßgebliche Abgrenzungs- oder Definitionsmerkmal. Aus der Perspektive der Schweiz und Deutschlands richten sich entsprechende Aktivitäten zur Deckung des IT-Fachkräftebedarfs vor allem auf die Länder Mittel- und Osteuropas, die im Zuge der Osterweiterung bereits Mitglied der EU geworden sind bzw. auf der Warteliste stehen.

Mittel- und Osteuropa im Fokus

hotel moskau

Warum sind diese Länder besonders interessant? Zum einen, weil hier in der Regel ein sehr gutes Ausbildungsniveau besteht und es im IT-Bereich einen noch nicht so eklatanten Nachfrageüberhang gibt. Im Gegenteil, hier suchen viele IT-Fachkräfte nach wie vor nach adäquater Beschäftigung in ihrer Heimat. Andere Argumente für diesen Raum sind die gute Infrastruktur, die politisch-wirtschaftliche Stabilität, die Vergleichbarkeit des rechtlichen Rahmens, die kulturelle und mentale Nähe – entscheidend für eine gute Zusammenarbeit – und last but not least die niedrigeren Arbeitskosten.
Es gibt in der Praxis viele Formen der Nahverlagerung. Wichtig ist es, einen kompetenten und erfahrenen Dienstleister zu finden, mit dem Nearshoringkonzepte erfolgreich umgesetzt werden können und der die Verhältnisse vor Ort genau kennt. Dies genau ist die Kernkompetenz von Interventure.

Bildquelle: Flickr (CC: insm , poolie, lab604)

4 Nearshoring-Vorteile [Infografik]

Posted by Marko Djuric on November 23, 2015
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Die Zeiten, in denen Offshoring die perfekte Lösung für die Auslagerung betrieblicher Teilaufgaben darstellte, sind vorbei. Nearshoring ist die zukunftsweisende Alternative und zeichnet sich durch eine ganze Reihe von Vorteilen aus.

InterVenture und Partake gehen eine Nearshoring Kooperation ein

Posted by Marko Djuric on September 3, 2015
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Wir freuen uns sehr unsere Nearshoring Kooperation mit Partake AG (www.partake.de) bekannt zu geben.

Das erfolgreiche Software Haus aus Berlin wird mit Ihrem dediziertem Java Team mit InterVenture in Belgrad Ihre führende Dokumentenmanagement Technologie ESCRIBA.de weiter ausbauen.

Das Belgrader Partake Team ist schon in Berlin und wird zum Training 4 Wochen vor Ort verbringen um einen effizienten Wissenstransfer zu vollziehen. Danach werden sie aus Belgrad als vollwertige Teammitglieder von Partake Ihre Arbeit fortsetzen und den Wissenstransfer auf zusätzliche Kollegen übernehmen.

“Aufgrund der Grösse und Komplexität von ESCRIBA sind wir nicht in der Lage Aufgaben wie beim klassischen IT Outsourcing auszulagern. Wir müssen vielmehr gute Softwareentwickler in unser Team einbinden damit sie den Gesamtkontext verstehen. InterVenture als unser dedizierter IT Partner ermöglicht uns genau dies.”

Dr. Ulli Kohl, CTO partake AG

InterVenture Best Practices: Tomatoes Rot, and So Does the Code

Posted by Zoran Horvat on July 20, 2015
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Clean coding is one of the programming elephant paths of today. “Clean code always looks like it was written by someone who cares.” – says Michael Feathers. It asks for new practices and specific discipline. As a result it brings back the results.

In time, we have recognized value of clean code. We at InterVenture have seen it help maintain long running projects with less effort and with higher confidence. We have learned to keep focus on the principles of clean code.

One of the most prominent protagonists of clean coding, and one of the authors of the Agile Manifesto, Robert C. Martin – Uncle Bob – has defined Principles of Object-Oriented Design. In his own words, these principles were divided into those that deal with class design, package cohesion and couplings between packages.

We want all programmers in our company to keep focused on these principles and to follow them with full understanding. This is not because we want all programmers to write the same way – Principles are not dogma and they do not lead in that direction – but because merely thinking about them trains the programmer’s eye to recognize code designed well.

So what have we done to help programmers keep an eye on the Principles of OOD? We have printed them on the wall. Now everyone can see them and, from time to time, ponder over them. We cannot tell whether this idea has enhanced our coding skills – we will never know. But we like to think that it will make us a bit better programmers in the end.

InterVenture und NEXUS Netsoft starten eine Nearshoring Kooperation

Posted by Marko Djuric on July 7, 2015
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Wir freuen uns sehr unsere Nearshoring Kooperation mit NEXUS Netsoft GmbH (www.nexus-netsoft.de) bekannt zu geben.

Die erfolgreiche Full-Service – Internetagentur aus Langenfeld wird mit ihrem dedidizierten Web Team mit InterVenture in Belgrad die E-Commerce- und Web-Development Bereiche stärker ausbauen um noch effizienter Kundenanforderungen bedienen zu können.

Die Trainingsphase hat schon begonnen, wobei die ersten Belgrader Mitarbeiter einen Monat im NEXUS Büro in Langenfeld verbringen um sich mit allen lokalen Teamkollegen, Prozessen und Strukturen bekannt zu machen. Danach werden sie aus Belgrad Ihre Arbeit fortsetzen.

“Das Own Team Model von InterVenture ermöglicht es uns im Gegensatz zum  klassischen Offshoring, unsere Belgrader Mitarbeiter als wahre “Nexianer” aufzustellen und zu managen.”

Tim Wedler, CEO NEXUS Netsoft GmbH

IV Best Practices: Automating the Release Process with custom MSBuild Scripts

Posted by Marko Lazic on June 26, 2015
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In .NET world MSBuild is the build engine, the guy that transforms your code to binaries. Code is built by interpreting scripts and they hold a sequence of build steps. Usually, the only scripts that are used are project files, like csproj or vbproj files. On build server, you can specify a solution or project file to build. However, it can do much, much more if you use it with custom scripts.

When starting the build, build server (TFS, TeamCity) passes a reference to your sln or csproj file to MSBuild. If you set it to pass the reference to another file, say ‘main.build’, MSBuild will try to interpret it as a build script.

This script can have multiple custom build steps. These could include validation of properties which are passed to script or setting up folders for build output before the build itself.

Regarding the build part, it can simply call another instance of MSBuild to build a solution or few of them and perhaps enforce a specific output directory. After the build script could have a step to run unit tests.

If build and tests pass, script can create a release/setup package by simply copying a set of files somewhere, by zipping them or by running a separate tool for making a setup (ClickOnce, InstallShield etc.). This can also include an obfuscation step for desktop applications.

Script can run your setup package, install your service to IIS web server and/or run scripts to setup database and actually create new environment. If needed, a set of integration tests using tools for automated testing (SoapUI) could be used to verify package as a whole.

Automated cycle from build to deployment can greatly increase confidence in your code, both yours and your client’s. Hence you could come to a point where you automatically deploy to production environment if tests pass. This way you are going towards continuous delivery, an ideal of developers and clients.

Many utility applications (testing frameworks, archiving utilities) support running through command line interface, which are great for running from MSBuild script. Also, many other functions like executing SQL script against a server, or setting up stuff on web/application server are wrapped in tasks built by community. Finally, you can build you own tasks in C# or VB.NET for really special cases.
References:

http://www.soapui.org/

http://www.msbuildextensionpack.com/

Why Nearshoring in Belgrade? This is another interesting reason: Lonely Planet’s best places in Europe 2015

Posted by Marko Djuric on June 18, 2015
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Belgrade is shaping up to become the tech hub of Southeast Europe due to the large local talent pool. We witness this development on an everyday basis and there are currently many good software companies coming to Belgrade. We also witness many engineers from the neighboring countries (Croatia, Bosnia, Slovenia, Macedonia….) moving to Belgrade as there are all the advantages of a modern city – good infrastructure, a very interesting and positive spirit, nice weather conditions combined with a stable political situation. There is also a clear 2018 roadmap for Serbia direction EU.

Next to these “hard facts” Lonelyplanet is giving another interesting reason for nearshoring in Belgrade:

“Wearing its elegant but crumbling facades as a badge of honour, Belgrade has emerged as Europe’s in-the-know destination in recent years. Its boisterous nightlife has brought comparisons to those much more famous (and expensive) ‘Bs’ in the west, Barcelona and Berlin. Add in hearty cuisine, a blossoming hostel scene and improved air connections to the rest of Europe, and the stage is set for exploring beyond the river-barge clubs….”

Read more: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/travel-tips-and-articles/lonely-planets-best-places-in-europe-2015#ixzz3dPIouR8a

InterVenture Best Practices: Craftsman, Not a Smith

Posted by Zoran Horvat on June 16, 2015
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Writing code is a beautiful experience. Every programmer will surely testify it is. Writing software is a different thing, though. It is a job, and it comes with things not so attractive. First of all, it comes with customer requirements. Then it comes with schedules and deadlines. It is also known of constant change, which greatly undermines team’s efforts to deliver what was planned. Passion of coding gradually fades away, letting it all become more of a code smith kind of work.

When that happens, and it happens in virtually every software project, we look for ways to contain the difficulties and keep the project in track. Otherwise, code would begin to rot and team’s ability to progress further would be jeopardized.

The answer is in turning the coding practice into craftsmanship. It is not simple and it is far from easy. It takes time and endurance, it requires guidance and talent. But it requires less today than it used to ask for in the past. As in any other profession, one can become a craftsman by walking the elephant paths made by the craftsmen of the past.

We have seen structured programming, object-oriented programming, functional programming, aspect-oriented programming, and so on, all of that in a life span of a single programmer. Talking about “past” in this context may sound silly. Time is so condensed when it comes to computes. It is not a wonder that some of the great programmers of the past are actually active programmers today. All of these paradigms were invented to help professionals put their black belt on sooner rather than later.

We at InterVenture Nearshoring pay close attention to grow the culture of craftsmanship in our development teams. We see value in applying established practices, especially in the domain of programming theory. That gives our teams ability to manage code in the long run.

Writing software is difficult enough – there is no reason to make it even more difficult by following bad practices.

Treffen Sie uns and der diesjährigen topsoft in Zürich

Posted by Marko Djuric on June 9, 2015
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InterVenture ist auch dieses Jahr an der topsoft am 25. und 26. August in Zürich dabei.

Wir freuen uns auf interessante Gespräche rund um das Thema erfolgreiches IT Outsourcing.

Besuchen Sie uns und lassen Sie uns besprechen wie unser OWN TEAM Nearshoring Model Ihnen langfristige Wettbewerbsvorteile verschaffen kann.

Eine gute Zeit und bis bald!

 

InterVenture Best Practises: Estimates In the Agile Development Process

Posted by Zoran Horvat on May 27, 2015
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Yes, developers are strange. Let’s just face it. Developers operate on a different wavelength than managers. Agile developers in particular tend to deliver in short cycles, listen for the client feedback and turn that into the next development cycle.

At the same time, management wants to know dates and costs. Asking the developers to estimate and then promising deliveries based on estimates fails miserably. Why is it so?

Falling Into the Trap

Mapping the management view onto development processes may lead to difficulties. And when difficulties begin to emerge, management often decides to strengthen the process control, only to make difficulties even more obvious.

And here is the rule of thumb: Asking developers for estimates and then putting those into a delivery road map is road map to disaster.

Things never happen that way, and estimates turn to be misleading. Managers then often look for rescue by turning to strict plan following mode. They micromanage every single developer’s activity, sometimes going into bizarre details. It all makes the development less efficient, causing even longer delays. This vicious circle quickly lowers the efficiency of the whole team, leading to further drop in motivation and many other undesired effects.

Agile Development Process

Through trial and error, we have learned that the development process should be simple. We all apply agile principles of software development, but the agility is sometimes compromised.

To keep the agility part alive in the agile project management process, we actually try to move managers away from developers. Managers are there to identify medium-term priorities. Prioritized tasks are then mixed with client’s feedback on previous deliveries to form the next development iteration.

From the development point of view, the world ends there. All the complexities of management processes, all the company-to-company negotiations, promises, strategic directives, they all live over the edge of the developers’ world.

Then How Does It Go With the Estimates?

When development is truly agile, its cycles are stable and regular. Very quickly, and that is in no more than two months, management can observe actual velocity of the team. By velocity, we mean the amount of features that can be delivered in a period of time, such as two or four weeks.

This measure is then used to roughly estimate how much time it would take the team to deliver certain larger feature. Negotiations with clients can then be steered by this almost trivial measure.

By putting the velocity into the equation, we are ensuring that the management will never feel the urge to directly manage developers. Consequently, efficiency of the development is constantly kept high, as well as the positive sentiment in the development team.

InterVenture Best Practises: Product Owner, Not Project Manager

Posted by Zoran Horvat on May 12, 2015
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In our company, we are trying to regulate the development in slightly indirect ways. We have recognized that direct management of developers is a bad idea. Quite the contrary, we have recognized that nourishing a well-informed product owner brings benefits that cannot be achieved otherwise.

Product owner is responsible to join the three poles of the structure: clients, management and development. Product owner maps management’s long-running plans into short development cycles. Product owner ensures that development is paying due attention to client’s feedback and medium term priorities set by the management.

The Rule Is: No Direct Control Over Developers

Managing software development team boils down to managing relations between the product owner and the team. As long as both ends of this relation perform well, there is no need for the company managers to interfere and destabilize the development.

We believe that direct management fails in development because programmers do not have the same set of interests as managers. Programmers have deeper technical understanding of the problem. They need requirements, explanations about the product, list of priorities. The rest is programming and that is what development team does the best.

Our past experience confirms that development teams perform best when they are left alone with their goals set. The goal of the management then is to set development goals. This typically boils down to setting priorities and providing the development with the information they need.

The Other Way In the Two-Way Street

It will probably sound like a stereotype if we say that software development is a two-way street. But it definitely is a process in which both sides – those who use the software and those who write it – have to pay attention to what the other side has to say.

It is sometimes hard to explain things. Users have their own ways when it comes to doing business. Will the developers stay in the way, forcing a solution which may have technical justification but simply doesn’t fit user’s needs? Or will the programmers put an extra effort to reach a solution which is of higher value to the user?

Will the users stay stubborn and confident in their opinion even in cases where a certain level of technical knowledge would help them get a better understanding? Or will they listen to advice from programmers?

These are the situations in which product owner can mediate. He can help close the scope of each iteration so that both the developers are able to ship the solution in due time and clients are satisfied with the features they receive.

Why Not Project Manager?

From our past experience we can confidently say that development teams do not need to be managed. They need explanations of what the software is expected to do. They need information which features are more important than the others. They need someone to value their technical expertise and to incorporate it into the requirements.

These are the needs of the development team. The role which suits them best is the Product Owner. At the same time, Project Manager role tends to close the communication and make the development one-way process, which doesn’t help develop a working software.

InterVenture Best Practises: If It Ain’t Simple, It Ain’t Agile

Posted by Zoran Horvat on April 28, 2015
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Writing software is amazingly simple when it comes to processes. Don’t let the complexity of the software itself sneak into the process of producing code. Understanding and modeling the domain, testing and packaging, all of those are one side of the coin. Managing the process is the other side.

Who is Managing Whom?

In our industry there are three poles, each lead by a mindset significantly different than the others. There are clients, management and development. They all gather their strengths to produce software that works. But their means are different. Clients specify requirements, development produces code, and managers mediate so that the working software is deployed.

And the devil hides in this last detail. Management is responsible to deliver software. Management is signing contracts and giving promises. Then management feels the desire to manage developers more directly and to see that all that was promised is delivered in due time.

That is the point where management can take too many responsibilities in own hands and actually cause damage to the end product.

Principles of Agile Development

Only a few of the most prominent elements have found their place in the Manifesto for Agile Software Development. And that is not the coincidence. Agile development promotes straightforward management model. Here are the principles:

  • We value individuals and interactions over processes and tools.
  • We value working software over comprehensive documentation.
  • We value customer collaboration over contract negotiation.
  • We value responding to change over following a plan.

That is all there is in it. No place for endless meetings, management reports, charts and pies, plans that span weeks or even months of development time. There is no room for managers who like strict progress following. Such practices distract development and their overall effect is that the product gets to production later.

Conclusion

Esther Derby, agile practitioner and speaker, recently gave a brief but well placed comment on the way agile development is managed in some companies. “Many managers in organizations with traditional functional hierarchies want the benefits of agile without disrupting the status quo. Not going to happen.”

We will conclude this article in the same spirit. While practicing agile development for years, we have become convinced that the company management should manage company, rather than to manage the way in which developers are writing code.

Serbia’s ICT Industry Report 2015

Posted by Marko Djuric on March 2, 2015
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“The outsourcing sector of the software development industry has long favoured Asian countries for low costs of service, thus helping the software development outsourcing to India gain momentum over the years. However, tables are turning and Eastern European countries are asserting their presence in the IT outsourcing market, especially Serbia which is recognized as high level and one of the most promising IT outsourcing destinations.

Many key global players such as Microsoft, SKF Group, Adobe, Oracle, Google, Hewlett Packard, SAP, IBM, Siemens, Intel, Cisco, NCR Corporation, Erickson and others, have already tapped into this potential…”

Let’s have a chat on the “Silicon Valley meets Switzerland” day on 12th March

Posted by Marko Djuric on February 5, 2015
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Dear Friends,  “Out of the Box Thinkers” and Entrepreneurs

Another very interesting opportunity to exchange experiences and discuss potential cooperation ideas is emerging on 12th March in Brugg-Windisch.

The “Silicon Valley meets Switzerland” event: http://extendance.com/svms/ will host exciting start-up stories from both sides of the ocean and we will be present with our own stand as the co-sponsor of the meet-up.

We look forward to meeting you.

Best regards and see you soon.

Your InterVenture Team

Pick Your Development Tool: ConEmu – switch to consoles for more productive programming

Posted by Marko Lazic on January 27, 2015
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Developers in my company (and most senior developers in general) are power users. Power users often need to access functionality of OS that is not available in GUI (or meant to be). On the other hand, they want to automate repetitive tasks.

This is the place where consoles step in. A typical developer uses consoles to do work at least some of the time. It can include cmd or PowerShell for starting applications and debugging their output, git bash console or other. Solutions included with Windows are often lacking ease of use, many features and possibility for customization.

ConEmu is a great host for console applications on Windows. It means it can display output of consoles (and other applications) through it’s own UI. And it adds a lot of value while doing so.

It uses term task to refer to hosted applications. It offers an option to set up predefined tasks (hosted applications) and many of the usual ones come already set up. These include most of one’s needs like: cmd, PowerShell, Git bash or Chocolatey. It can host standard permissions and administrator level running tasks. And it’s not only about consoles. You can also include file managers like TotalCommander or FarManager, Filezilla, stand-alone source control clients, text editors or any other application. Tasks are displayed and navigated as tabs or separate windows depending on settings.

As far as using it with consoles, main idea is that it hooks up to a process, uses its console output and displays it in own window. This window is customized in terms of background, fonts, colours, width and height and length of logged output. This log is easily searchable and scrollable. It has fine performance with high frequency logging and can host console GUI applications like Git bash in some modes, Far Manager, Vim editor and similar.

Using ConEmu helps you by having all the utility consoles in one place, formatted to your liking. It automatically remembers the list of tasks and can restart them when you start ConEmu.

The author of this article is using ConEmu in more than few scenarios:
One PowerShell console with administrator privileges to execute tasks in Windows related to configuration, mounting drives, copying or setting up IIS. Another one as a support for programming and building solutions in Visual Studio – it is easy to run MSBuild to build multiple solutions (build scripts) of your source code. I actually run the same scripts that the build server is running, but in my console. This way I don’t break builds on build server any more. I also use one Git bash console for local git repository, more if working on different projects at once. I use it for reviewing status, changes, staging and committing, as well as analysing history. Other source control options such as TFS, or SVN also support this way of working. In general, most have a set of options that are only available through command line use. From non-console applications, I embedded Far Manager and FileZilla for copying, moving, archiving and backups. This way I have streamlined my build, test and deploy process.

The author and his colleagues recommend switching to consoles for performing some tasks. Once you get hooked up, it is hard to go back to GUI.

As another great recommendation Scott Hanselman, well known developer, blogger and speaker, has included ConEmu in his list of top developer / administration tools, which is available at: http://www.hanselman.com/blog/ScottHanselmans2014UltimateDeveloperAndPowerUsersToolListForWindows.aspx

References:
ConEmu: https://conemu.codeplex.com/
PowerShell: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/scriptcenter/default
Git: http://git-scm.com/
TotalCommander: http://www.ghisler.com/
Far Manager: http://www.farmanager.com/index.php?l=en
Filezilla: https://filezilla-project.org/
Vim: http://www.vim.org/
Scott Hanselman: http://www.hanselman.com/

Sprint Planning in Distributed Scrum Team: Lessons Learned

Posted by Zoran Horvat on January 13, 2015
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Having a team which is separated geographically carries several challenges, one of them being the question of planning sprints. Root problem here is that members holding different roles are stationed in distant offices.

One of the most important lines of division appears between business analysts and development staff. Problems arise because these two parts of the larger team often think differently about upcoming work. Subtle differences tend to hide in joint meetings, just to appear in form of a missing feature when it is too late. Another common scenario occurs when client partners form an incorrect image regarding team’s capacity. Such misconceptions may lead to inadvertently giving false promises to clients.

One particular team practice that we have discovered turned to be able to remedy this unfortunate situation. Normally, tasks that the team works on are kept in the product backlog. These tasks are subject to many changes. Backlog exhibits changes on a daily basis. On the other hand there is the sprint backlog, which contains tickets selected to be completed in the current product version. The communication and planning problem highlighted above actually lives in the product backlog. With product backlog growing ever larger, the chances are that client partners’ intentions regarding upcoming versions will gradually begin to drift away from those of the development.

To address the issue, we propose another backlog to be defined – we call it Future Sprint Backlog. It is dimensioned to contain tasks for at least one and at most two normal sprints. Changes to the future sprint backlog are allowed without many restrictions. The purpose of this group of tasks is not to define team’s work for the following sprint. It is rather intended to reveal plans of the business.

Development observes the upcoming work and grabs the opportunity to estimate it. That is where the dimension of the backlog comes into play. By estimating future tasks and asking client partners to remove extraneous ones, developers are telling which of the desired tasks could be planned for upcoming versions.

This special-purpose backlog can still change. It can even be subdued to significant changes. This is because the team has not committed to any of the tasks it contains. Its primary role remains to limit the amount of work that management might commit to clients. All in order to avoid unfortunate situations when the company makes a commitment to deploy features which go beyond capacity of its development team.

DOING BUSINESS IN SERBIA 2014

Posted by Marko Djuric on December 8, 2014
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“… As the world market for ICT continues to evolve towards outsourced software engineering, offshore systems design and integration, Serbia is well-placed both geographically and structurally to provide a cost-effective, reliable alternative to more established markets. An outstanding pool of intellectual capital, attractive labor costs, excellent skills, good communications networks and a high fluency in English are just some of the key competitive advantages that persuade international companies to expand their businesses to Serbia.”

9 Key Factors for successful Nearshoring

Posted by Marko Djuric on October 28, 2014
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Building a talented and strong distributed team from various disciplines is in any new project or venture a challenge. But the most difficult thing to find is, not necessarily people with certain skills, but an organisational and management style which allows distributed team members to develop their full potential and remain intrinsically motivated over a long period of time.

IT Outsourcing Service Provider Performance & Satisfaction

Posted by Marko Djuric on October 14, 2014
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“IT- Auslagerungen sind im Trend. Der Grund für IT-Outsourcing ist bei den meisten Firmen im DACH-Raum die Kosteneinsparung. Zwei Drittel der Unternehmen verlagern Daten und Prozesse ins Ausland.”

Quelle: http://www.netzwoche.ch/de-CH/News/2014/10/13/IT-Auslagerung-immer-noch-im-Trend.aspx

InterVenture Belgrade Office

Posted by Marko Djuric on September 25, 2014
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We are PET FRIENDLY and always will be.

A tour through Belgrade

Posted by Marko Djuric on August 22, 2014
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Join our tour through BELGRADE – the beautiful, never-sleeping capital of Serbia and Europe’s emerging IT Hotspot.

Outsourcing and Offshoring in CEE: Colliers White Paper Q2 2014

Posted by Marko Djuric on August 4, 2014
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“Belgrade represents one of two south-Eastern countries in the CEE region – Bulgaria and Serbia – which are reported to have the highest percentage of graduates holding technical degrees in IT and engineering across the CEE region. This underpins the potential of these locations as suitable locations for O&O operators.”